From Novel to Movie Hell

February 16, 2010

I finished the From Hell Graphic Novel a few days ago and I’ve been reading through the appendix, which, I might add is taking me as long as reading through the main part. However, during the weekend I watched the movie again and it’s quite easy to see why Alan Moore would be so against it.

The Graphic is so strict to a lot of historical events and takes a lot of references from what appear to be reputable sources, that for a movie to be made from it would either have to take a small part of the Graphic novel or would have to be a very long movie. It’s hard to give a blow by blow account of all the failings that happen in the movie as I’m not really that motivated to sit through the movie more than twice in a lifetime. At the fore is the mixture of Mr Abberline and Mr Lees characters and the introduction of Abberline being a opium fiend. Now that I think back I don’t remember there being much mention of the letter that inspires the name of the Graphic novel.

There is also no mention of Hawksmoor’s churches which really are the main inspiration behind the Graphic novel.

Either way, just a short one, but the graphic novel is something that has inspired me to read a bit more about the ripper murders and masonry, etc.

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Obama swats a fly and the internet hates PETA

June 18, 2009

So it seems like if the president swats a fly the media look to create some kind of storm about it. You can read at the moment on many ‘reputable’ news sources that PETA is throwing a hissy fit about Obama swatting a fly. This, however, is totally incorrect. Just the tiniest bit of searching finds us at The PETA Files (I hate to make the joke but I’m sure there is someone in Peta who is a PETA File…). Here is the article that clearly states

Believe it or not, we’ve actually been contacted by multiple media outlets wanting to know PETA’s official response to the executive insect execution.

In a nutshell, our position is this: He isn’t the Buddha, he’s a human being, and human beings have a long way to go before they think before they act.

The media contact PETA, PETA give a generalised statement about human beings and the media twist it to make it look like PETA are saying bad about the President. Then everyone and his sister get hold of it and scream and shout till the cows come home.

Oh well, you decide, just for the record I don’t particularly like PETA and this is one of the only times I’ll ever be on their side!


Watchmen

March 17, 2009

I’ve been waiting for Watchmen to be released for quite some time. For those who don’t know, as most of you probably don’t, Watchmen is an adaptation of the brilliant (an understatement) graphic novel by Alan Moore. As with most adaptations, it’s not completely true to the original text. In fact, there are quite a lot of changes, but having said that, and having thought about it long and hard, I have to admit that the movie is very close to the original text. Far closer than most movies ever get and the movie is a good two and three quarter hours long.

For the movie to be completely true it would probably have to be released as a series of movies, maybe 6 or so, each being about 2 hours at least. This is because there are so many side plots, time jumps and things that are explained so well through the medium of comic but which are nigh on impossible to translate on to the big screen without creating a mammoth. An example of this is the psychologist who, in the movie, appears very briefly but in the comic the psychologist passes Rorschach daily. His plotline interacts with many of the other complex plotlines which eventually all come together at the end.

The psychologist goes through trials and tribulations in his marriage because of his apparent kindness and need to help other people.The movie introduces this character very briefly as a means to show you things about Rorschach, but then he’s gone. It’s almost as if he’s only there so as to make the movie feel more complete to fans of the comic book, which is something that annoyed me. There’s no real way of putting all of this into the movie without giving the psychologist character his own movie, or a large chunk of a movie and if you think that there are at least five of these characters you get to a story of about six hours or more. I don’t want this to become a rant on why I disliked the movie.

It’s obvious I’m a seething fanboy who wanted the completeness and quirkiness of the comic to come across in explicit detail and it’s just not something that’s ever going to happen. Either way, finally, I can say I’m pleased with the result, with things to be desired of course. However, something that was brought up with me was what your regular John Smith would think of it. They’re probably not going to get any of the references to the psychologist, or the journalists. They won’t see Rorschach pottering about because they just don’t know that they’re meant to be looking for a creepy fellow with a sign. It also, unfortunately, seems that they don’t get very much of anything else from the movie, or the people I have heard about don’t.

I’d love to hear what other people thought of it who had not read the comic book as, at a guess, I think everyone who has reviewed it would probably have done a bit of research on it and read the comic book.


Solving my daily commute woes

October 8, 2008

Everyone has a frustrating journey in to work, or, that’s what we assume when we have a frustrating journey in to work. I’m sure that someone who works on a gorgeous island in the middle of a fantastic sea doesn’t have a frustrating time getting out of their comfy bed and walking down the beach every morning. This, however, is neither here nor there. The fact of the matter is, when commuting to work in a train or car you need to find ways to amuse yourself and bring your mood up.

Normally I’m quite good at keeping my mood up, I see grumpy commuters, people getting in eachothers way, and I amuse myself and their distress. I use their misery to help lift my spirits, which sounds terribly nasty but if I could lift their spirits as well, I would. However, this hasn’t been working of late because I’ve been reading on the way to work and my commute has just changed to a busier route. As a result of the busier route I often move to let people onto the train which means I can’t read my book. Such sacrifices are rarely rewarded with very much, but other people will persist on making it so that they can read, but so that you (me) cannot. Because of this I have to find other ways to keep my spirits up during the morning commute and today I realised I should write daily posts about various things that happen on my daily commute, behaviour and realisations about how people act.

This then, is my first observation. There are very few people who will actually reward you for being kind and generous on the London tube. Be weary about giving up your seat, something I do, as people will position themselves so as to get seats before anyone else, or look especially grumpy. I have noticed this more of older women, who I would happily give up my seat for, but when they walk right up beside people sitting down in a brisk fashion and suddenly look grumpy and tired I feel like I’m being manipulated or made to feel guilty.

If you demand my seat, you’re not getting it. If you feel you have a right to my seat, you probably don’t. It infuriates me that people think they have to have a seat. This displays itself in middle aged men (they won’t demand my seat, but they do position themselves so as to get seats) who have most probably been sat down all day in front of a computer and will sit down when they get home in front of a tv no doubt. What really brought this to my attention was when a (probably beggar) got on the train, and, looking look he was uncomfortable asked for some middle aged mans seat. I am unaware of the exact conversation, but the guy sitting down replied with “so do I”.

I appear to have disappeared into a black hole of digression and with that I will stop, safe in the knowledge that people on the London Tube, during the rush hour, are selfish and ungrateful swine (and apparently the plural of swine, is swine).


Firefox ‘feature’ strikes again

September 17, 2008

We all remember, well, I remember, when Firefox had a wonderful feature that hogged memory like nobodies business. This was to do with the way it cached tabbed browsing and there was, I believe a way to turn it off.

I use firefox for certain sites that I can’t access any other way (continuum, which has a bug in its cookies that Firefox apparently doesn’t handle properly) and I’m ok with it, it does what it’s mean to do (for me), for the most part. However, today I came across this bug which is a problem with the way that Firefox’s anti-phishing works. It basically states that if a file path is being sent to the server through a form it should be truncated so that just the filename is sent and not the full path. What a great feature, all those forms I’m going to fill out with full paths which could be used by phishers (there probably is a usecase), but the real problem comes when you have someone like this guy who clearly needs the standard functionality.

Once again Firefox team haven’t really thought through their ‘feature’ and it’s going to cause them problems with Chrome and Opera being strong contenders. Opera having all the functionality and more of Firefox (without the ability to write complex extensions) and Chrome being the new kid on the block with a whole host of its own problems but the ability to move forward in a way that Firefox doesn’t seem to be able to.